Adding Services

Services are the basic unit of deployment in Garden. You add them when you want to run your code somewhere. A simple service configuration looks like this:

kind: Module
type: container
services:
- name: backend
ports:
- name: http
containerPort: 8080

Note that not all modules types have services.

How it Works

Services belong to modules and you'll usually have a single service per module. You can think of a service as a running instance of your module.

You deploy your services with the garden deploy command. You can also delete services with the garden delete service command. And you can get service logs with the garden logs command.

Calling Services

The following is specific to the Kubernetes providers.

If you specify a port for a given service, other services from inside the cluster can reach it. By default, it's reachable from http://my-service:<port>/.

If you specify an ingress, your can reach your service from outside the cluster. For example by using the garden call command or with curl.

The default ingress for local development is http://demo-project.local.app.garden/<ingress-name>. You can override this by setting a hostname under the ingress directive.

Services in the Stack Graph

Services correspond to a deploy action in the Stack Graph.

  • Services implicitly depend on the build step of their parent module.

  • Services can depend on tasks and other services.

  • Tasks and tests can depend on services.

Examples

Here are some simple examples of services in Garden. Note that these are specific to Kubernetes.

Simple Container Service

This example shows a backend service with a health check. Notice that it doesn't have an ingress since it's not meant to be reachable from the outside.

Notice also that the servicePort is set to 80, the default port. This is so that we can call the service directly from within the cluster with http://backend/my-endpoint.

The containerPort (the port that the process inside the container is listening on) is set to 8080.

Finally, we set an environment variable that's available to the service at runtime, and can be referenced in our code.

kind: Module
type: container
services:
- name: backend
ports:
- name: http
containerPort: 8080
servicePort: 80
healthCheck:
httpGet:
path: /healthz
port: http
- env:
# You can access this variable at runtime in your code.
DATABASE_URL: https://my-database:5432/

Frontend Service

This example shows a frontend service. It has an ingress so that it's reachable from outside the cluster. We've also set a custom hostname so that the full path becomes: http://my-app.my-org/.

This service has a dependency on a backend service which means it won't be deployed until the backend service has been deployed and is responding to health checks. This also means that the service gets re-deployed on changes to the backend.

kind: Module
type: container
services:
- name: frontend
ports:
- name: http
containerPort: 8080
ingresses:
- path: /
port: http
hostname: my-app.my-org
dependencies:
- backend

Advanced

Disabling Services

Module types that allow you to configure services generally also allow you to disable services by setting disabled: true in the service configuration. You can also disable them conditionally using template strings. For example, to disable a container module service for a specific environment, you could do something like this:

kind: Module
type: container
...
services:
- name: frontend
disabled: ${environment.name == "prod"}
...

Services are also implicitly disabled when the parent module is disabled.

How Services Map to Kubernetes Resources

A container service maps to a Kubernetes Deployment resource. If you specify a port, Garden will create a Service resource for the Deployment. And if you specify an ingress, Garden will create a corresponding Kubernetes Ingress resource.

By default the Kubernetes provider does a rolling update for deployments.

Further Reading

For full service configuration by module type, please take a look at our reference docs.

Next Steps

In the next section, we'll see how Garden can run your tests for you.